Inuit have found ways that reconcile the sexual identities that coexist in a being. It's a whole theory of the soul, a whole system of reincarnation that unfolds. In Igloolik, it is a firm belief  that living things could emerge from the hummocks of the earth. For the first humans, nuna, (land) was female. She was not only the original womb but also a supplementary source of nourishment- one could say placenta. Summer is women's season and winter is men's. This sexual dualism is at the origin of the Inuit conception of the world. This system even allows the overlap between the sexes, with the appearance of a man-woman or a third sex.

 (Thérien 1978).


"Uannaq is the great male northwesterly wind, bringing cold violent blizzards. Nigiiq is his female southeasterly opposite, a gentle wind accompanied by soft, slushy snowfalls. The two are antagonists: when one blows, the other stays calm, and vice versa. They were the winds that Inuit feared the most. The first wind prevented winter hunting at the breathing holes of marine mammals, and the second one melted igloos and made travel by dogsled very hard. When either blew for a long while, a shaman had to be called in to try to calm the wind.

Inuit cosmogony shows us a symbolic system; the forces of nature are conceptualized against a background of sexual differentiation, in a relationship of opposition/complementarity. Man possesses the north, the cold, the winter, the qualities of strength and violence, and the activities performed outdoors, with Moon Brother as his symbol. Conversely, woman possesses the south, the warmth, the thaw, the lamp, and the home, with Sun Sister as her symbol. This is according to Ujarak’s account, for whom the moon controls one wind and the sun the other.”

(Thérien 1978).

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